SYP Assignment 1: Preparation of ‘Asking for feedback’

SYP Assignment One: Preparation of ‘Asking for feedback’

Exam notes

 

Link to Learning Log

 

Learning Objective

LO2 coherently present a body of work, making creative presentation decisions that complement your subject and/or your artistic strategies 

Criteria

Application (most applicable)

Applying increasingly professional personal and graduate skills to initiate and sustain studies and emerging practice, and highly relevant practical, technical, and communication skills to articulate ideas, and outcomes effectively. 

90–100 

Applying exceptional increasingly professional personal and graduate skills to initiate and sustain studies and emerging practice, and extensive highly relevant practical, technical, and communication skills to articulate ideas, and outcomes effectively. 

80–89 

Applying accomplished increasingly professional personal and graduate skills to initiate and sustain studies and emerging practice, outstanding highly relevant practical, technical, and communication skills to articulate ideas, and outcomes effectively. 

70–79 

Applying confident increasingly professional personal and graduate skills to initiate and sustain studies and emerging practice, excellent highly relevant practical, technical, and communication skills to articulate ideas, and outcomes effectively. 

SYP Assignment One: Asking for feedback

Brief 

Prepare a PDF document with the intention of showing it to an industry professional and asking them politely for a short piece of feedback. This should contain an edit of the work you produced for B​ody of Work.​ You may wish to include an overarching artist’s statement as well as the introduction you wrote in Body of Work. In the first instance, you’ll use this to introduce your work and your ideas to your tutor who will give you suggestions on the submission itself and how to enhance the PDF before sending it out. Please tell your tutor who the PDF is intended for and include some background information on how you’ll contact them. Make sure that you’ve researched the form your submission should take; some organisations still ask for a CD/DVD, for example, which you should prepare in advance. 

Having taken your tutor’s comments on board, use your PDF document (or, if applicable, a hard copy portfolio) to get some feedback from a professional photographer or another professional from within the industry. This could be done via a portfolio review or by a contact you already have. 

Before you submit any work to your tutor, remind yourself of the assessment criteria listed in the introduction to this course guide and do a self-assessment of your submission, checking your work against the criteria.

SYP Assignment One: Asking for feedback

1. Preliminary research and thoughts

31st January 2022

I have already completed some useful and comprehensive learning on the 4th and 8th of January using Lens Cultures’ excellent handbook (Lens Culture, 2021). You can find these links on my blog. From there I produced a draft intro, bio and CV and artist statements.

SYP – Preparing a project statement, artist statement, bio and CV for a portfolio review No 1 (Lens Culture framework)

SYP – Preparing a project statement, artist statement, bio and CV for a portfolio review No 2

I had already made the decision to get feedback on my BOW submission ‘Visible Invisibility’ and ‘Remotely’ and that shows in the drafts that I did earlier this month.

Here is my summary of what I produced.

1.1 VISIBLE INVISIBILITY 

1.1.1: Project Statement

“I’m upset about Covid. As a family doctor working in the northeast of England, I’ve spent time with patients and doctors talking about the pandemic. Mostly it’s about listening, information, and sadness. Few people seem to be angry, but there’s much to be angry about, such as delayed lockdowns, inadequate PPE, and a huge death toll. 

In this work, I connect with my feelings and concerns about how the Covid-19 pandemic has been managed. It is a reflexive investigation, using vernacular and my own medical paraphernalia, to create conceptual still life assemblages that are serious and playful. They mark my ‘ordinary’ pandemic events of ‘Amazon’ deliveries, bulk buying pasta, and working from home in extraordinary times. Collectively they challenge dominant medical and governmental representations and readings of the Covid-19 pandemic, such as the government’s support of Dominic Cumming’s visit to Barnard Castle and a delayed public enquiry. Foucault’s ideas about resisting dominance inform my work as do the assemblage works of Man Ray and Sarah Lucas. 

My personal views connect my story to wider social and cultural understandings about the pandemic. These cultural perceptions are heterogeneous but at their extremes are either supportive or critical of the UK pandemic response. My assembled stories question dominant medical, governmental and media narratives about the pandemic, that we have been ‘following the science.” (219 words).

Initial reflections on this edit (January 4th)

  1. I think I have made this more personal by adding ‘me’ more
  2. I think that the illustration of Dominic Cummings is a UK specific reference, but I like it – maybe a more general reference such as about NHS stress might be better.
  3. I think the title of my work might need to change – it makes connects the subject very well, and one thing I have noticed is that without labels some people do not ‘get’ what it is about. The quote “following the science’ is a powerful mantra quote here and in the USA.
  4. I have decided to go The PHOTOGRAPHER’S Gallery next to get feedback about my Project statement.”

1.1.2: Artists Statement

“Version 1: I am uneasy about injustices. I see them most in health and social care because that is where I live and work as a family doctor. I’m not someone who turns a blind eye to inequity or wrong: I have turned from complaint ‘Insider’ to critical ‘Outsider’ as I create and show images that challenge injustice and harmful ideologies. Much of my work documents my own feelings and experiences of working as a doctor, but I also explore the concerns of patients and others with qualitative research being a feature of my practice. My work is often personal, political, diaristic and documentary but recently I have been exploring conceptual forms to communicate my messages. My work matters because I want it to make a difference in how we view health care and those injustices.:

Initial reflections (4th January)

Maybe I will come back that…maybe it can be another idea that is not about injustice. I have been looking at Les Monahan’s work and comments about his work which is not specific and maybe this is the way to go (Monaghan, 2017). Let’s put that on the backburner to develop.”

1.1.3: Bio

“Dr Morris Gallagher is a doctor who has always been interested in innovation and ideas. For most of his career that has been as an award-winning family doctor working in addictions and research in the northeast of England. More recently that passion has been expressed in creating photographs and artworks that say something about health and social care and his experiences of working within an institution. Most of his work is personal, diaristic and documentary but sometimes he incorporates conceptual approaches that are the best vehicle for sharing his messages.

Initial reflections (4th January)

I think that I will leave this as it is the initial proposal that will be most important then the part about what I am about. 

1.1.4: CV

I’ve written many of these for health care research bids and to show my profile on LinkedIn for potential photography projects, and tried to bring this together on 4th January but will leave till needed.

1.2 REMOTELY 

1.2.1: Project Statement 

I already was burnout before Covid came along.  As a family doctor working in the northeast of England, I’ve spent a year in 2020-21 shielding from COVID-19 confined working from a bedroom at home, with a break from work in the middle. In between listening to distressing patient stories online, ‘Amazon’ deliveries, watching Covid briefings and sleepless nights I created images and art that communicate my distress and adjustments. I’ve also listened to other shielding GPs on Zoom who have a wider experience. 

This work I explore my inner psychological states by staging dioramas in my home consulting space. I also tap into other GPs experience of working from home. It is a reflexive investigation, using vernacular, medical and other objects ordered on ‘Amazon.’ These room images reference Freudian psychological responses such as displacement and isolation, and adaptations to distress. They are being influenced by the room work of Sarah Hobbs ‘Small Spaces.’ 

My personal views connect my story to wider social and cultural understandings about the pandemic such as working from home (WFH) and being in ‘Lockdown.’ 

Initial reflections on this new edit (8th January)

That is not sharp or clear and needs a bit of work. 

References

Lens Culture (2021) Photographers’ Guide to Working with Galleries. At: https://www.lensculture.com/photography-free-guides. LensCulture_Gallery_Guide_2021-2.pdf (Accessed 04/01/2022).

2. Reflections

2.1 Interacting with others

I have joined an SYP group organised by Helen Rosemier. I am glad that she has done that as it takes the pressure off me to arrange an informal network of people at the same stage of the degree. 

I have presented on the Live Hub, but I think that is useful for early work or to resolve uncertainties. 

The most beneficial feedback so far has been my professional portfolio reviews with Red Eye and Lens Culture. They were detailed and commented on my introduction and bio which led me to completely overhaul them. I am a member of Red Eye and have booked two free reviews on 7th February. This will be before I get a response from my tutor about A1 but I am not too worried about that as my tutor is looking more at the bigger picture and not the detail of what I have done – I think! 

I intend to ask Les Monaghan to comment on my work. He and Moira have been tutors in the past and I have visited them to look at exhibition of his work in Doncaster. I have seen his work at other sites. It is political and imaginative in placing it and I think that is what I am looking for, ideas about placement. 

I know a gallery owner and another gallery director but there are other areas in this module where they might be more helpful in giving feedback to a well-developed proposal. 

2.2 What questions do I have for these reviews?

In the Lens Culture submission, you are asked to identify one or two questions that you want the answer to. This is not surprising as it is not face to face and comes back as a written summary. They and Format also do face to face reviews, but they are not for some time. 

Questions that I need to answer about my work.

VISIBLE INVISIBILITY

Do I need to re-shoot this work to improve its quality or to produce more images for a larger series?

Where can I market my work?

REMOTELY

Is there enough there to market a series?

What about my idea of it being part of a book?

What about my idea about physical artwork?

Maybe it is a little too soon to ask those later questions AND it would be best if I produce some work. 

3. NEW Project Statements

31st January 2022

I’ve had plenty of time to think about this project as it came to the fore at the end of the module and needed work after completing A5. I have kept up to date about the politics of coronavirus and recently read an excellent book on how the media and government have framed the public discourse around covid (Price and Harbisher, 2022). I think that there is a better name for this project which is ‘Following the Science?’ because this idea is easily understood ‘myth’ by observers (Price and Harbisher, 2022; 139-158). I can see that as a neon sign at the start of my gallery exhibition. Perhaps the Foucault inspired title will resonate with the OCA examiners as there is a tendency for them to select and promote complex ideas. Maybe that is not a good idea in marketing a product for people to buy or see.

3.1 ‘Visible Invisibility’ or ‘Following the Science?’

New text

I’m upset about Covid. As a family doctor working in the northeast of England, I’ve spent time with patients and doctors talking about the pandemic. Mostly it’s about listening, information, and sadness, but there’s much to be angry about, such as delayed lockdowns, inadequate PPE, and a huge death toll. 

In this conceptual work I connect with my feelings and concerns about how the COVID -19 pandemic has been managed. It is a reflexive investigation, using vernacular objects and medical paraphernalia, to create life assemblages that are serious and playful. They mark the ‘ordinary’ pandemic events of ‘Amazon’ deliveries, bulk buying pasta, and working from home in extraordinary times. Collectively they challenge dominant medical and government readings of the COVID -19 pandemic, such the government’s support of Dominic Cumming’s visit to Barnard Castle and a delayed public enquiry. Foucault’s ideas about resisting dominance inform my work as do the works of Man Ray and Sarah Lucas. 

My personal views connect my story to wider social and cultural understandings about the pandemic. These cultural perceptions are heterogeneous and at their extremes are supportive or critical of the UK pandemic response. My assembled scenes make us question whether we have been ‘following the science.’ (202 words).

3.2. ‘Remotely’

New text

As a family doctor working in the northeast of England, I spent much of 2020 consulting from a bedroom at home. In between listening to patient stories online, ‘Amazon’ deliveries, and sleepless nights, I reshaped that workspace to explore my feelings about working from home (WFH). I also interviewed other shielding GPs online. 

This work primarily explores my psychological reactions to WFH by staging dioramas of those responses in my emptied consulting space. It is a reflexive investigation, using vernacular, medical and other objects ordered from ‘Amazon.’ They reference Freudian and Jungian psychoanalytical theories about the unconscious, such as displacement and isolation, and contemporary adaption theory. They are also informed by the staged room work of Sarah Hobbs.

My experiences connect my story to wider social and cultural understandings about the pandemic and WFH during ‘Lockdown.’ There has been a surge in mental health problems, such as anxiety, depression, and domestic abuse, presented to health care providers in response to pandemic restrictions. That emotional ‘fallout’ is seen daily, face to face and online, in my NHS work and continues to be expressed behind the closed doors of many homes. 

3.3 Reflections on the new text

I think that the ‘Remotely’ text has sharpened up particularly how that connects with societal concerns. I am thinking about shaping that as a bid to ‘Doctor’s in Distress’ to make the images in a book with an interview etc. 

The other strength of both summaries is that there is a strong personal element. 

I will probably need to work on the artist statement and CV and do this now for my submissions.

I think I will stop there as I will get feedback from my tutor and external reviewers.