SYP – A 1: Preparing a project statement, artist statement, bio and CV for a portfolio review No 1 (Lens Culture framework)

SYP – A 1: Preparing a project statement, artist statement, bio and CV for a portfolio review No 1 (Lens Culture framework)

Exam Notes

Learning Objective

LO2 coherently present a body of work, making creative presentation decisions that complement your subject and/or your artistic strategies 

Criteria

Application (most applicable)

Applying increasingly professional personal and graduate skills to initiate and sustain studies and emerging practice, and highly relevant practical, technical, and communication skills to articulate ideas, and outcomes effectively. 

90–100 

Applying exceptional increasingly professional personal and graduate skills to initiate and sustain studies and emerging practice, and extensive highly relevant practical, technical, and communication skills to articulate ideas, and outcomes effectively. 

80–89 

Applying accomplished increasingly professional personal and graduate skills to initiate and sustain studies and emerging practice, outstanding highly relevant practical, technical, and communication skills to articulate ideas, and outcomes effectively. 

70–79 

Applying confident increasingly professional personal and graduate skills to initiate and sustain studies and emerging practice, excellent highly relevant practical, technical, and communication skills to articulate ideas, and outcomes effectively. 

Introduction

4th January 2022

I have already made detailed notes of learning about approaching galleries from this document (Lens Culture, 2021). This tab focuses on the written preparation for approaching a gallery or for a portfolio review. This is the subject of SYP A1.

This article is about 

+  Written materials

+  Portfolio 

+  Website and social media 

+  leave-behind marketing 

+  List of Works 

1. PROJECT STATEMENT 

Can be written in first- or third-person Length: 100 – 250 words 

Your project statement provides context for a specific body of work, and you’ll need one for each project in your portfolio. Project statements should be both informative and engaging; they function as an invitation for the reader to look at the work and understand your intentions. 

FIRST, BRAINSTORM 

Answering some key questions before you start writing can give you some momentum and side-step the dreaded writer’s block. Starting a stream-of- consciousness brainstorm exercise can also give you clarity when it comes time to write. 

Make a list of adjectives 

Print out your work or arrange it on a screen so that you can look at it carefully. Think of as many words as you can to describe it. The thesaurus is your friend! You’ll come back to these words when you start to write. 

Innovative, amusing, playful, striking, challenging, conceptual, assemblage, paraphernalia, medical, domestic, vernacular, cohesive, contemporary, societal, power, relations, commentary, suggestive, creative

Physically describe the work 

What materials are used, what format is the work in, and what size is it? 

These are assembled objects photographed which are highly processed to create a high key look – Size 42×29.7 A3 with some files at this size being 91MB in size. They can be larger than this and I would see them as  A2 in size in a gallery (594 x 420). They will be digital or printed images on dibond.

How was the work made? 

Does the technique add important context to viewing the work? Why did you feel it was important to make the work in this way? If you are using an alternative image-making process, is it relevant to your work conceptually or contextually? If so, why? 

I am dealing with incidents and abstract concepts about communication and the exercise of power during the pandemic. The high key look is about exposure of the subject. Using domestic products and my own medical paraphernalia is about grounding the work in my home and experiences and reflecting the work of previous assemblage practitioners such as Man Ray. Sarah Lucas – political comment.

Why was the work made? 

It is primarily a response to my anger and distress about how government has led us during this pandemic.

Can you describe your intentions, inspirations or motivations behind making this work? 

The intention was to say something about the exercise of power during the pandemic. I was inspired by my tutors encouragement to experiment and the work of Man Ray and Sarah Lucas. I captures many of my feeling and questions about the pandemic.

Is there a broader social, political, cultural or personal context that you are exploring or responding to? 

Yes – this series articulates some unanswered questions about governmental responses to Covid.

What is the work about? 

Making Visible unasked, unanswered and difficult questions about the governmental management of the pandemic.

Does your work explore themes, ideas, or something else?

Hegemony and power.

How do you want your audience to feel or react? 

To consider, smile, laugh, ponder, be disturbed or angry.

Ultimately, you can’t control how your audience will interpret your work, but you can try to influence them through your project statement. Make some notes on which direction you’d like them to take. 

My responses as a doctor are important. My personal take is important. The underpinnings of my theoretical base on power relations by Foucault is important. Relating to general societal questions is important.

Why should your audience care? 

It is an issue that many people feel as well as think something about. People will bring their personal narratives and experiences of COVID to their viewing.

Why is what you are saying significant and valuable? What are you wanting me to think about that deserves attention? Why is your voice the best one to transmit this information? 

I am a doctor working with people who have covid or whose family have died of it. I have been shielding for a year. I am angry about some decisions – I believe that much of that anger by people is quashed and unexpressed. 

How does this work link with your broader artistic practice? 

It reflects my interest in controversial health and social care issues, where much of my work comments or critiques contemporary expressions of care. Much of my work has been documentary but this is conceptual as it is a better vehicle for articulating challenge and criticism. 

Is it part of an ongoing interest or investigation of a particular topic? Does it reflect a new direction, or build on an existing body of work? 

Yes. This is my practice to challenge visual and practical culture in medicine.

How does this work relate to broader themes in relation to art and photography? 

It relates to the broad theme of critique. Perhaps mine is more overt than other series of images. 

Does it challenge existing understandings, theories or ideas?

Yes, there is exposure and a clarity about some of the hidden or suppressed issues about COVID. Powers that be do not want the stone to be lifted to reveal issues that are problematic or counter the regimes of truth that the government make.

THEN, MAKE A DRAFT 

I’m starting with my introduction to BOW which was much improved by Feedback from a Lens Culture review in October 2020. 

Reflections on the Introduction to my BOW (A5)

I’m upset about Covid. As a family doctor working in the northeast of England, I’ve spent a lot of time with patients and doctors talking about the pandemic. Mostly it’s listening, information, and sadness. Few people seem to be angry, but there’s much to be angry about, such as delayed lockdowns, inadequate PPE, and a huge death toll. 

In this work, I connect with my feelings and concerns about the Covid-19 pandemic. It is a reflexive investigation, using vernacular and medical paraphernalia, to create abstract still life assemblages that are serious and playful. They mark the ‘ordinary’ pandemic events of ‘Amazon’ deliveries, bulk buying of pasta, and working from home in extraordinary times. Collectively they challenge dominant medical and governmental representations and readings of the Covid-19 pandemic, such the government’s support of Dominic Cumming’s visit to Barnard Castle and a delayed public enquiry. Foucault’s ideas about resisting dominance inform my work as do the assemblage works of Man Ray and Sarah Lucas. The title is a play on Foucault’s concept of ‘Invisible Visibility, of revealing what is hidden. 

My personal views connect my story to wider social and cultural understandings about the pandemic. These cultural perceptions are heterogeneous but at their extremes are either supportive or critical of the UK pandemic response. My assembled stories question dominant medical, governmental and media narratives about the pandemic, that everything has gone ‘as well as it might be expected.’ 

  1. There are many good points, such as it is not too long but…
  2. Should there be more about the role of photography to challenge the status quo?
  3. It could include more about that society is asking these questions. 
  4. I’ve been to and for about my opening words about anger but after reading this guide maybe that needs to be expressed to make it stand out rather than it being benign art speak.
  5. There is a better idea reference at the end – Price, S. and Harbisher, B. (2022)
  6. I am also wondering if the title is to ‘erudite’ or academic and maybe it should be ironic such as ‘Following the Science’

Let’s edit this original text to something better

New edit of my Project Statement

I’m upset about Covid. As a family doctor working in the northeast of England, I’ve spent time with patients and doctors talking about the pandemic. Mostly it’s about listening, information, and sadness. Few people seem to be angry, but there’s much to be angry about, such as delayed lockdowns, inadequate PPE, and a huge death toll. 

In this wor, I connect with my feelings and concerns about how the Covid-19 pandemic has been managed. It is a reflexive investigation, using vernacular and my own medical paraphernalia, to create conceptual still life assemblages that are serious and playful. They mark my ‘ordinary’ pandemic events of ‘Amazon’ deliveries, bulk buying pasta, and working from home in extraordinary times. Collectively they challenge dominant medical and governmental representations and readings of the Covid-19 pandemic, such as the government’s support of Dominic Cumming’s visit to Barnard Castle and a delayed public enquiry. Foucault’s ideas about resisting dominance inform my work as do the assemblage works of Man Ray and Sarah Lucas. 

My personal views connect my story to wider social and cultural understandings about the pandemic. These cultural perceptions are heterogeneous but at their extremes are either supportive or critical of the UK pandemic response. My assembled stories question dominant medical, governmental and media narratives about the pandemic, that we have been ‘following the science.” (219 words).

Initial reflections on this new edit

  1. I think I have made this more personal by adding ‘me’ more
  2. I think that the illustration of Dominic Cummings is a UK specific reference, but I like it – maybe a more general reference such as about NHS stress might be better.
  3. I think the title of my work might need to change – it makes connects the subject very well, and one thing I have noticed is that without labels some people do not ‘get’ what it is about. The quote “following the science’ is a powerful mantra quote here and in the USA.
  4. I have decided to go The Photographers Gallery next to get feedback about my Project statement.

Project Statement or Artist Statement? 

You’ll notice that a project statement is sometimes referred to as an artist statement. This can be a little confusing because an artist statement can also be the overarching philosophy and motivation behind an artist’s work, not just a single project. If you’re not sure what type of statement is being requested by a gallery, ask for clarification. 

I think that this is a good point. The artist statement is “overarching’ in terms of the work that I do and my practice. Normally I would include both. 

2. ARTIST’S STATEMENT

The Lens Culture Guide does not take us into this area, so I am NOT back-tracking to statements that I have developed in BOW as a starting point. Much of my thinking has been influenced by the Book by Williams about writing about art (Williams, 2014). Miranda Gavin’s guide is also very helpful https://www.oca.ac.uk/weareoca//photography/introducing-miranda/

Notes on Miranda’s video

10-15 images – series

Artist statement – Complex images said clearly – “not nonsense.” Who is the audience and avoid dropping in theoretical names? Unless is ties into your work – complementary. Photos first – then see how I fell then to the artist statement. Treat the audience with respect. I hear Barthes all the time!

Notes on Artdex guide

This is quite a good guide (Artdex, 2021). 

Simply put, an artist statement is a description of your work in your own words. It is an explanation of why you do what you do and how you made what you created. You can have an artist statement for each piece of art you create. You can also have an artist statement that represents your entire body of work. An artist statement explains your creative process, including your motivations, inspirations behind, mission, and methods. It should include your choice of mediums and use of tools and techniques.

It’s the WHY WHAT AND HOW. I think for the A1 SYP context it is the “overarching” statement about me and my work. It is like a highlight or caption that draws people into the work and gives CONTEXT AND RELEVANCE.

My work is created in middle or 2021 – that is an important fact that I need to include in my project summary.

THEN, MAKE A DRAFT 

Version 1: I am uneasy about injustices. I see them most in health and social care because that is where I live and work as a family doctor. I’m not someone who turns a blind eye to inequity or wrong: I have turned from complaint ‘Insider’ to critical ‘Outsider’ as I create and show images that challenge injustice and harmful ideologies. Much of my work documents my own feelings and experiences of working as a doctor, but I also explore the concerns of patients and others with qualitative research being a feature of my practice. May work is often personal, political, diaristic and documentary but recently I have been exploring conceptual forms to communicate my messages. My work matters because I want it to make a difference to how we view health care and those injustices.

Version 2:  ?

Maybe I will come back that…maybe it can be another idea which is not about injustice. I have been looking at Les Monahan’s work and comments about his work which are not specific and maybe this is the way to go (Monaghan, 2017). Lets put that on the backburner to develop.

CV

Length: 

+  Your CV can be as long as your experience requires 

+  Your Resume is a summarized version of your CV, ideally 2-3 pages 

+  Occasionally you may be required to submit a 1-page Resume 

Written in third person. 

Your CV is a comprehensive and exhaustive document that lists information relevant to your artistic career history. It is a very important component
in your suite of professional materials, and is the one document gallerists and curators rely on to find out about your experience and achievements 

to date. Keep it simple and factual, and be ruthless in cutting out any detail that doesn’t directly relate to your practice. At the beginning of your career, it’s ok not to have an extensive resume or exhibition list, and many galleries enjoy discovering new talent. So be honest, don’t inflate your resume, and be proud of where you’re at. 

Your resume is a summarized version of your CV and only includes the most important information. Your bio is a narrative version of your resume (see page 79). 

Key inclusions:
Name & Contact Details 

Jane Doe (b. 1983, UK) 

hello@janedoe.com | janedoe.com +44 123 456 789 | IG: @janedoeart 

Education history 

Include the name of the school, the name of the program, and the year you graduated. Include education that is relevant to your practice. 

Victorian College of the Arts, Master of Fine Arts, 2015 

Exhibitions 

If you already have some exhibitions under your belt, great! List the year, title of the show, gallery and city, starting from the most recent. If you have a long list of exhibitions, separate out the list into solo and group exhibitions. Tip: Use ‘selected exhibitions’ to imply a curated list of exhibitions, whether you have a lot of exhibitions or not. 

2019 Beyond BoundariesAperture Gallery, New York 

Collections 

List the public institutions that own your artwork, such as museums, corporate collections, municipal collections or agencies. If you only
have artwork in private collections, don’t list the individual collector unless they give you permission and they’re well known in the industry. 

National Gallery of Art, Australia Private collection, Hong Kong 

Awards 

List the awards, grants, prizes and other honors that you have received for your work. 

2020 British Council Grant 

2018 Taylor Wessing Prize for Photographic Portraiture, Finalist 

2017 ING Unseen Talent Award, Winner 

Press 

List reviews, interviews, journals and media articles in which your work has been featured, including print and online. 

Sebag-Montefiore, Clarissa. “From Manus Island to sanctions on Iran: the art and opinions of Hoda Afshar”. The Guardian, 13 November 2018, https://www.theguardian.com/ artanddesign/2018/nov/13/from-manus-island-to-sanctions-on- iran-the-art-and-opinions-of-hoda-afshar. 

Publications 

List details of your monographs or publications that have featured your work. Cite your sources consistently, using a recognized citation guide. 

2019 Buchakjian, Gregory: “Personal Spaces, Public Places”, On Photography in Lebanon, KAPH 2018, p. 223-242 

My LinkedIn text 

It’s a daunting task creating this CV as it does not feel that I have anything to put in it, but maybe I have. I have produced a CV for my linked in profile mainly as a way of recruiting participants to show my research experience. The Problem, with my research career, is that every CV has a different purpose; in this case, it is more about my photographic life and life as an artist.

I’m going to use my Linked in entry as a starting point as it was designed for my whistleblowing work in 2017 – to show that I was a serious researcher and to recruit national figures for interviews and later to photograph.

Photography student Open College of Arts.
Interested in health (NHS) and social care photography. Have a look at my site where I examine cervical, smear taking, abuse, emotional pain, grief and ‘Anti-superheroes’
Personal website: morris-gallagher.format.com
Commission (Oct 2017) – helping substance misuse service users to photograph what ‘Recovery’ is.
“Life after whistleblowing” project – Oct 2017
2018-2020 – 2 year project looking at digital representations. My work included a film of me as an ‘healing’ avatar in 2150 and Roscharch blood blots of my own blood overplayed with my abnormal angiograms and CT scans. 
2020 – Currently planning a collaborative project looking at the psychological impact of GP working in lockdown. Also doing autoethnographic work exploring my own experiences. See my website or Twitter feed.
Available for personal or commercial projects.

Clinical care to undifferentiated patients.
Clinical lead for complaints, significant events, substance misuse, cardiovascular care. Leading on quality improvement, patient involvement and inclusion and primary care research.
Former Royal College of GPs Research Fellow – GP attitudes to HIV.
Research publications on AIDS, telephone working, access management and making an appointment at the GP surgery (Doctorate)!

A founder member and former Clinical Medical and Research Director, 2008-2014; Clinical Governance lead, research such as GP and nurse focus groups’ views on alcohol management for SOTW Health and innovative peer-based research with drug users and kinship carers.
Developed, GP, Nurse and Pharmacy prescribing frameworks (controlled drugs – methadone and buprenorphine) and delivered appropriate training and support – three of these nurses now prescribe. 
2006-13. South Tyneside RCGP training lead in substance misuse, Hepatitis B+C care, alcohol care and management. 2004-12 GP research and training in South Tyneside – several publications with First Contact Clinical and two jointly with other third sector organisations.
From July 2014; Employed to provide medical care to dual diagnosis and complex clients. Also examining abstinence-based prescribing.

2011-13 Innovative peer-based research training programme (no Powerpoint!) for substance misusers and kinship carers. Three published projects in collaboration with First Contact Clinical, service users, commissioners and other 3rd sector organisations. 
2004-2006 Forum-net
PCT/Central Surgery/Altana Pharma project to develop a network of GP, dental and pharmacy patient forums. 
2003-2008 – Substance Misuse
With Dr David Julien developed a model for managing substance misuse in general practice. 
2001- 2004 – Patient Forum development 
Developed a model for developing Patient Forums in general practice. South Tyneside Communication Award 2004. 
April 1998 – March 2003 – Doctorate of Medicine (MD)
The University of Newcastle upon Tyne. Participant observation study of how patients and professionals negotiate appointments. Several publications. Lectured on qualitative methods MSc course 2001-2003 on computer analysis in qualitative research, 
Sept 1997-Aug 2001. Director of Northern and Yorkshire Research practice 
Portfolio of research into telephone working, physiotherapy, and managing access and demand.  
1995-2000. Telephone triage development
Developed daytime telephone triage of acute consultations with a team of 4 practice nurses. Won the NatWest/Doctor award (Oct 1997) for innovation in general practice.
1992-95 Member of South Tyneside MAAG
Responsible for developing consumerist audit/ research. Projects included a nominal group study of patient priorities for diabetes care, in collaboration with the CHC and Centre for Health Services Research in Newcastle, and a Delphi Study to inform diabetes policies. 
1991 Fellowship of the RCGP, for contribution to HIV/AIDS research in primary care.
1987- 89 RCGP Research Fellow
A national study of the impact of HIV on General Practice in England, Wales and Scotland funded by the Department of Health. The largest survey of GPs and HIV in the world (5,300). 
Member of DoH/RCGP working party on HIV in primary care.

First Medical Director for Phoenix House in South Shields – this is a Tier 4 residential drug and alcohol detox and rehabilitation unit and is part of a national network of drug communities.
Witnessed the advent of HIV to this population group and developed the charities national policy for managing HIV jointly with someone who has since died of AIDS.
Left to become RCGP HIV/AIDS Research fellow.
Returned as medical director in 2011-12 – mainly providing detox to complex alcohol clients – introduced new standards.

Draft CV 

I  am taking things from this Bio that seem relevant then may work through drafts which will lead to a resume or bio.

I have been working as a GP in the northeast of England since 1981. Much of my work has included primary care research and substance misuse care. Former Royal College of GPs Research Fellow – GP attitudes to HIV. (1989). Research director

Health Education England 2016 photo challenge. Two images of mine ‘The GP’ and the distressed GP’ were included in the final online publication 

Entries have been selected and compiled into an online book on the Health Education England  www.hee.nhs.uk/gpphotobook

Health Education England (2016) Nothing general about General Practice: Two images by Dr Morris Gallagher, ‘The GP’ and ’The distressed GP (2015). At: http://www.hee.nhs.uk/gpphotobook (Accessed 07/07/2016).

2014 – date Open College of the Arts, Photography degree course. 
Commission (Oct 2017) – helping substance misuse service users in a recovery group to photograph what ‘Recovery’ is. First Contact Clinical, South Tyneside.

Name
Dr Morris Gallagher

morrisgabc@gmail.com | morris-gallagher.format.com | IG @morrisg

Education history 

University of Newcastle of Tyne, undergraduate (1979) and doctoral medical degree (2001). Final year (2022) of Open Collage of Arts, Photography degree 

Commissions, publications and exhibitions

Commission (Oct 2017) – helping substance misuse service users in a recovery group to photograph what ‘Recovery’ is. First Contact Clinical, South Tyneside. 

Health Education England (2016) Nothing general about General Practice: Two images by Dr Morris Gallagher, ‘The GP’ and ’The distressed GP (2015). At: http://www.hee.nhs.uk/gpphotobook (Accessed 07/07/2016).

Collections 

List the public institutions that own your artwork, such as museums, corporate collections, municipal collections or agencies. If you only
have artwork in private collections, don’t list the individual collector unless they give you permission and they’re well known in the industry. 

National Gallery of Art, Australia Private collection, Hong Kong 

Awards 

List the awards, grants, prizes and other honors that you have received for your work. 

2020 British Council Grant 

2018 Taylor Wessing Prize for Photographic Portraiture, Finalist 

2017 ING Unseen Talent Award, Winner 

Press 

List reviews, interviews, journals and media articles in which your work has been featured, including print and online. 

Sebag-Montefiore, Clarissa. “From Manus Island to sanctions on Iran: the art and opinions of Hoda Afshar”. The Guardian, 13 November 2018, https://www.theguardian.com/ artanddesign/2018/nov/13/from-manus-island-to-sanctions-on- iran-the-art-and-opinions-of-hoda-afshar. 

Publications 

List details of your monographs or publications that have featured your work. Cite your sources consistently, using a recognized citation guide. 

2019 Buchakjian, Gregory: “Personal Spaces, Public Places”, On Photography in Lebanon, KAPH 2018, p. 223-242 

I think that this CV can develop this year as I present my work and grow my CV. It is probably the hardest thing to do at the moment as I am not quite clear what if any is relevant in the photographic world. I suspect my doctor work will come down to a few sentences.

BIO

An artist biography is a summary of the significant events of your life that lead up to your art career. Unlike an artist statement, an artist bio can be written in the third person. It will include when and where you were born and where you are now based.

An artist bio can talk about how you first became interested in art and where you studied. It can discuss your education, degrees, formal art training, or apprenticeship programs you participated in. Essentially, an artist bio connects the impact your life history has on your artwork and talks about your concepts, philosophies, inspirations, and influences. (Artdex, 2021).

Your artist biography, on the other hand, can be used on your website or your profile on a gallery site. It may also be used in articles, interviews, or exhibition catalogs.

I have produced a CV for my linked in profile mainly as a way of recruiting participants to show my research experience. Maybe I should start with my CV.

Draft No 1

I was born in…

No – that does not work

Draft No 2 

Dr Morris Gallagher is a doctor who has always been interested in innovation and ideas. For most of his career that has been as an award-winning family doctor working in addictions and research in the northeast of England. More recently that passion has been expressed in creating photographs and artworks that say something about health and social care and his experiences of working within an institution. Most of his work is personal, diaristic and documentary but sometimes he incorporates conceptual approaches that are the best vehicle for sharing his messages.

I think that I will leave this as it is the initial proposal that will be most important then the part about what I about. 

References

Lens Culture (2021) Photographers’ Guide to Working with Galleries. At: https://www.lensculture.com/photography-free-guides. LensCulture_Gallery_Guide_2021-2.pdf (Accessed 04/01/2022).

Price, S. and Harbisher, B. (2022) Power, Media and the Covid-19 Pandemic: Framing Public Discourse (Edited book). Oxon: Routledge. At: https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=OzZPEAAAQBAJ&pg=PT123&lpg=PT123&dq=follow+the+science+quote+pandemic+reference&source=bl&ots=g6HT-lti7u&sig=ACfU3U3u7_F7jESAK3o2yHkORYXQ8xWfrg&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwim_Yy7pp31AhXDQUEAHQXWD6wQ6AF6BAgoEAM#v=onepage&q=follow%20the%20science%20quote%20pandemic%20reference&f=false (Accessed  06/01/2022).

Williams, G. (2014) How to write about contempory art. London: Thames and Hudson.

Artdex (2021) The Complete Guide to Writing an Artist Statement in 2021. At: https://www.artdex.com/the-complete-guide-to-writing-an-artist-statement-in-2021/ (Accessed  06/01/2021).

Relative Poverty. http://www.relativepoverty.org (2017) Directed by Monaghan, L. (s.n.). (Accessed 06/01/2022).

Health Education England (2016) Nothing general about General Practice: Two images by Dr Morris Gallagher, ‘The GP’ and ’The distressed GP (2015). At: http://www.hee.nhs.uk/gpphotobook (Accessed 07/07/2016).

SYP – Preparing a project statement, artist statement, bio and CV for a portfolio review No 1 (Lens Culture framework)

Exam Notes

Learning Objective

LO2 coherently present a body of work, making creative presentation decisions that complement your subject and/or your artistic strategies 

Criteria

Application (most applicable)

Applying increasingly professional personal and graduate skills to initiate and sustain studies and emergingpractice, and highly relevant practical, technical, and communication skills to articulate ideas, and outcomes effectively. 

90–100 

Applying exceptional increasingly professional personal and graduate skills to initiate and sustain studies and emerging practice, and extensive highly relevant practical, technical, and communication skills to articulate ideas, and outcomes effectively. 

80–89 

Applying accomplished increasingly professional personal and graduate skills to initiate and sustain studies and emerging practice, outstanding highly relevant practical, technical, and communication skills to articulate ideas, and outcomes effectively. 

70–79 

Applying confident increasingly professional personal and graduate skills to initiate and sustain studies and emerging practice, excellent highly relevant practical, technical, and communication skills to articulate ideas, and outcomes effectively. 

Introduction

4th January 2022

I have already made detailed notes of learning about approaching galleries from this document (Lens Culture, 2021). This tab focuses on the written preparation for approaching a gallery or for a portfolio review. This is the subject of SYP A1.

This article is about 

+  Written materials

+  Portfolio 

+  Website and social media 

+  Leave-behind marketing 

+  List of Works 

1. PROJECT STATEMENT 

Can be written in first- or third-person Length: 100 – 250 words 

Your project statement provides context for a specific body of work, and you’ll need one for each project in your portfolio. Project statements should be both informative and engaging; they function as an invitation for the reader to look at the work and understand your intentions. 

FIRST, BRAINSTORM 

Answering some key questions before you start writing can give you some momentum and side-step the dreaded writer’s block. Starting a stream-of- consciousness brainstorm exercise can also give you clarity when it comes time to write. 

Make a list of adjectives 

Print out your work or arrange it on a screen so that you can look at it carefully. Think of as many words as you can to describe it. The thesaurus is your friend! You’ll come back to these words when you start to write. 

Innovative, amusing, playful, striking, challenging, conceptual, assemblage, paraphernalia, medical, domestic, vernacular, cohesive, contemporary, societal, power, relations, commentary, suggestive, creative

Physically describe the work 

What materials are used, what format is the work in, and what size is it? 

These are assembled objects photographed which are highly processed to create a high key look – Size 42×29.7 A3 with some files at this size being 91MB in size. They can be larger than this and I would see them as  A2 in size in a gallery (594 x 420). They will be digital or printed images on dibond.

How was the work made? 

Does the technique add important context to viewing the work? Why did you feel it was important to make the work in this way? If you are using an alternative image-making process, is it relevant to your work conceptually or contextually? If so, why? 

I am dealing with incidents and abstract concepts about communication and the exercise of power during the pandemic. The high key look is about exposure of the subject. Using domestic products and my own medical paraphernalia is about grounding the work in my home and experiences and reflecting the work of previous assemblage practitioners such as Man Ray. Sarah Lucas – political comment.

Why was the work made? 

It is primarily a response to my anger and distress about how government has led us during this pandemic.

Can you describe your intentions, inspirations or motivations behind making this work? 

The intention was to say something about the exercise of power during the pandemic. I was inspired by my tutors encouragement to experiment and the work of Man Ray and Sarah Lucas. I captures many of my feeling and questions about the pandemic.

Is there a broader social, political, cultural or personal context that you are exploring or responding to? 

Yes – this series articulates some unanswered questions about governmental responses to Covid.

What is the work about? 

Making Visible unasked, unanswered and difficult questions about the governmental management of the pandemic.

Does your work explore themes, ideas, or something else?

Hegemony and power.

How do you want your audience to feel or react? 

To consider, smile, laugh, ponder, be disturbed or angry.

Ultimately, you can’t control how your audience will interpret your work, but you can try to influence them through your project statement. Make some notes on which direction you’d like them to take. 

My responses as a doctor are important. My personal take is important. The underpinnings of my theoretical base on power relations by Foucault is important. Relating to general societal questions is important.

Why should your audience care? 

It is an issue that many people feel as well as think something about. People will bring their personal narratives and experiences of COVID to their viewing.

Why is what you are saying significant and valuable? What are you wanting me to think about that deserves attention? Why is your voice the best one to transmit this information? 

I am a doctor working with people who have covid or whose family have died of it. I have been shielding for a year. I am angry about some decisions – I believe that much of that anger by people is quashed and unexpressed. 

How does this work link with your broader artistic practice? 

It reflects my interest in controversial health and social care issues, where much of my work comments or critiques contemporary expressions of care. Much of my work has been documentary but this is conceptual as it is a better vehicle for articulating challenge and criticism. 

Is it part of an ongoing interest or investigation of a particular topic? Does it reflect a new direction, or build on an existing body of work? 

Yes. This is my practice to challenge visual and practical culture in medicine.

How does this work relate to broader themes in relation to art and photography? 

It relates to the broad theme of critique. Perhaps mine is more overt than other series of images. 

Does it challenge existing understandings, theories or ideas?

Yes, There is exposure and a clarity about some of the hidden or suppressed issues about COVID. Powers that be do not want the stone to be lifted to reveal issues that are problematic or counter the regimes of truth that the government make.

THEN, MAKE A DRAFT 

I’m starting with my introduction to BOW which was much improved by Feedback from a Lens Culture review in October 2020. 

Reflections on the Introduction to my BOW (A5)

I’m upset about Covid. As a family doctor working in the northeast of England, I’ve spent a lot of time with patients and doctors talking about the pandemic. Mostly it’s listening, information, and sadness. Few people seem to be angry, but there’s much to be angry about, such as delayed lockdowns, inadequate PPE, and a huge death toll. 

In this work I connect with my feelings and concerns about the Covid-19 pandemic. It is a reflexive investigation, using vernacular and medical paraphernalia, to create abstract still life assemblages that are serious and playful. They mark the ‘ordinary’ pandemic events of ‘Amazon’ deliveries, bulk buying of pasta, and working from home in extraordinary times. Collectively they challenge dominant medical and governmental representations and readings of the Covid-19 pandemic, such the government’s support of Dominic Cumming’s visit to Barnard Castle and a delayed public enquiry. Foucault’s ideas about resisting dominance inform my work as do the assemblage works of Man Ray and Sarah Lucas. The title is a play on Foucault’s concept of ‘Invisible Visibility, of revealing what is hidden. 

My personal views connect my story to wider social and cultural understandings about the pandemic. These cultural perceptions are heterogenous but at their extremes are either supportive or critical of the UK pandemic response. My assembled stories question dominant medical, governmental and media narratives about the pandemic, that everything has gone ‘as well as it might be expected.’ 

  1. There are many good points, such as it is not too long but…
  2. Should there be more about the role of photography to challenge the status quo?
  3. It could include more about that society is asking these questions. 
  4. I’ve been to and for about my opening words about anger but after reading this guide maybe that needs to be expressed to make it stand out rather than it being benign art speak.
  5. There is a better idea reference at the end – Price, S. and Harbisher, B. (2022)
  6. I am also wondering if the title is to ‘erudite’ or academic and maybe it should be ironic such as ‘Following the Science’

Let’s edit this original text to something better

New edit of my Project Statement

I’m upset about Covid. As a family doctor working in the northeast of England, I’ve spent time with patients and doctors talking about the pandemic. Mostly it’s about listening, information, and sadness. Few people seem to be angry, but there’s much to be angry about, such as delayed lockdowns, inadequate PPE, and a huge death toll. 

In this work I connect with my feelings and concerns about how the Covid-19 pandemic has been managed. It is a reflexive investigation, using vernacular and my own medical paraphernalia, to create conceptual still life assemblages that are serious and playful. They mark my ‘ordinary’ pandemic events of ‘Amazon’ deliveries, bulk buying pasta, and working from home in extraordinary times. Collectively they challenge dominant medical and governmental representations and readings of the Covid-19 pandemic, such the government’s support of Dominic Cumming’s visit to Barnard Castle and a delayed public enquiry. Foucault’s ideas about resisting dominance inform my work as do the assemblage works of Man Ray and Sarah Lucas. 

My personal views connect my story to wider social and cultural understandings about the pandemic. These cultural perceptions are heterogenous but at their extremes are either supportive or critical of the UK pandemic response. My assembled stories question dominant medical, governmental and media narratives about the pandemic, that we have been ‘following the science.” (219 words).

Initial reflections on this new edit

  1. I think I have made this more personal by adding ‘me’ more
  2. I think that the illustration of Dominic Cummings is a UK specific reference, but I like it – maybe a more general reference such as about NHS stress might be better.
  3. I think the title of my work might need to change – it makes connects the subject very well, and one thing I have noticed is that without labels some people do not ‘get’ what it is about. The quote “following the science’ is a powerful mantra quote here and in the USA.
  4. I have decided to go The Photographers Gallery next to get feedback about my Project statement.

Project Statement or Artist Statement? 

You’ll notice that a project statement is sometimes referred to as an artist statement. This can be a little confusing because an artist statement can also be the overarching philosophy and motivation behind an artist’s work, not just a single project. If you’re not sure what type of statement is being requested by a gallery, ask for clarification. 

I think that this is a good point. The artist statement is “overarching’ in terms of the work that I do and my practice. Normally I would include both. 

2. ARTIST’S STATEMENT

The Lens Culture Guide does not take us into this area, so I am NOT back-tracking to statements that I have developed in BOW as a starting point. Much of my thinking has been influenced by the Book by Williams about writing about art (Williams, 2014). Miranda Gavin’s guide is also very helpful https://www.oca.ac.uk/weareoca//photography/introducing-miranda/

Notes on Miranda’s video

10-15 images – series

Artist statement – Complex images said clearly – “not nonsense.” Who is the audience and avoid dropping in theoretical names? Unless is ties into your work – complementary. Photos first – then see how I fell then to the artist statement. Treat the audience with respect. I hear Barthes all the time!

Notes on Artdex guide

This is quite a good guide (Artdex, 2021). 

Simply put, an artist statement is a description of your work in your own words. It is an explanation of why you do what you do and how you made what you created. You can have an artist statement for each piece of art you create. You can also have an artist statement that represents your entire body of work. An artist statement explains your creative process, including your motivations, inspirations behind, mission, and methods. It should include your choice of mediumsand use of tools and techniques.

It’s the WHY WHAT AND HOW. I think for the A1 SYP context it is the “overarching” statement about me and my work. It is like a highlight or caption that draws people into the work, and gives CONTEXT AND RELEVANCE.

My work is created in middle or 2021 – that is an important fact that I need to include in my project summary.

THEN, MAKE A DRAFT 

Version 1: I am uneasy about injustices. I see them most in health and social care because that is where I live and work as a family doctor. I’m not someone who turns a blind eye to inequity or wrong: I have turned from complaint ‘Insider’ to critical ‘Outsider’ as I create and show images that challenge injustice and harmful ideologies. Much of my work documents my own feelings and experiences of working as a doctor, but I also explore the concerns of patients and others with qualitative research being a feature of my practice. May work is often personal, political, diaristic and documentary but recently I have been exploring conceptual forms to communicate my messages. My work matters because I want it to make a difference to how we view health care and those injustices.

Version 2:  ?

Maybe I will come back that…maybe it can be another idea which is not about injustice. I have been looking at Les Monahan’s work and comments about his work which are not specific and maybe this is the way to go (Monaghan, 2017). Lets put that on the backburner to develop.

CV

Length: 

+  Your CV can be as long as your experience requires 

+  Your Resume is a summarized version of your CV, ideally 2-3 pages 

+  Occasionally you may be required to submit a 1-page Resume 

Written in third person. 

Your CV is a comprehensive and exhaustive document that lists information relevant to your artistic career history. It is a very important component
in your suite of professional materials, and is the one document gallerists and curators rely on to find out about your experience and achievements 

to date. Keep it simple and factual, and be ruthless in cutting out any detail that doesn’t directly relate to your practice. At the beginning of your career, it’s ok not to have an extensive resume or exhibition list, and many galleries enjoy discovering new talent. So be honest, don’t inflate your resume, and be proud of where you’re at. 

Your resume is a summarized version of your CV and only includes the most important information. Your bio is a narrative version of your resume (see page 79). 

Key inclusions:
Name & Contact Details 

Jane Doe (b. 1983, UK) 

hello@janedoe.com | janedoe.com +44 123 456 789 | IG: @janedoeart 

Education history 

Include the name of the school, the name of the program, and the year you graduated. Include education that is relevant to your practice. 

Victorian College of the Arts, Master of Fine Arts, 2015 

Exhibitions 

If you already have some exhibitions under your belt, great! List the year, title of the show, gallery and city, starting from the most recent. If you have a long list of exhibitions, separate out the list into solo and group exhibitions. Tip: Use ‘selected exhibitions’ to imply a curated list of exhibitions, whether you have a lot of exhibitions or not. 

2019 Beyond BoundariesAperture Gallery, New York 

Collections 

List the public institutions that own your artwork, such as museums, corporate collections, municipal collections or agencies. If you only
have artwork in private collections, don’t list the individual collector unless they give you permission and they’re well known in the industry. 

National Gallery of Art, Australia Private collection, Hong Kong 

Awards 

List the awards, grants, prizes and other honors that you have received for your work. 

2020 British Council Grant 

2018 Taylor Wessing Prize for Photographic Portraiture, Finalist 

2017 ING Unseen Talent Award, Winner 

Press 

List reviews, interviews, journals and media articles in which your work has been featured, including print and online. 

Sebag-Montefiore, Clarissa. “From Manus Island to sanctions on Iran: the art and opinions of Hoda Afshar”. The Guardian, 13 November 2018, https://www.theguardian.com/ artanddesign/2018/nov/13/from-manus-island-to-sanctions-on- iran-the-art-and-opinions-of-hoda-afshar. 

Publications 

List details of your monographs or publications that have featured your work. Cite your sources consistently, using a recognized citation guide. 

2019 Buchakjian, Gregory: “Personal Spaces, Public Places”, On Photography in Lebanon, KAPH 2018, p. 223-242 

My Linked in text 

It’s a daunting task as it does not feel that I have anything to put in it, but maybe I have. I have produced a CV for my linked in profile mainly as a way of recruiting participants to show my research experience. The Problem, from my research career is that every CV has a difference purpose; in this case it is more about my photographic life and life as an artist.

I’m going to use my Linked in entry as a starting point as it was designed for my whistleblowing work in 2017 – to attract national figures for interview and to photograph.

Photography student Open College of Arts.
Interested in health (NHS) and social care photography. Have a look at my site where I examine cervical, smear taking, abuse, emotional pain, grief and ‘Anti-superheroes’
Personal website: morris-gallagher.format.com
Commission (Oct 2017) – helping substance misuse service users to photograph what ‘Recovery’ is.
“Life after whistleblowing” project – Oct 2017
2018-2020 – 2 year project looking at digital representations. My work included a film of me as an ‘healing’ avatar in 2150 and Roscharch blood blots of my own blood overplayed with my abnormal angiograms and CT scans. 
2020 – Currently planning a collaborative project looking at the psychological impact of GP working in lockdown. Also doing autoethnographic wok exploring my own experiences. See my website or Twitter feed.
Available for personal or commercial projects.

Clinical care to undifferentiated patients.
Clinical lead for complaints, significant events, substance misuse, cardiovascular care. Leading on quality improvement, patient involvement and inclusion and primary care research.
Former Royal College of GPs Research Fellow – GP attitudes to HIV.
Research publications on AIDS, telephone working, access management and making an appointment at the GP surgery (Doctorate)!

A founder member and former Clinical Medical and Research Director, 2008-2014; Clinical Governance lead, research such as, GP and nurse focus groups’ views on alcohol managment for SOTW Health and innovative peer-based research with drug users and kinship carers.
Developed, GP, Nurse and Pharmacy prescribing frameworks (controlled drugs – methadone and buprenorphine) and delivered appropriate training and support – three of these nurses now prescribe. 
2006-13. South Tyneside RCGP training lead in substance misuse, Hepatitis B+C care, alcohol care and management. 2004-12 GP research and training in South Tyneside – several publications with First Contact Clinical and two jointly with other third sector organisations.
From July 2014; Employed to provide medical care to dual diagnosis and complex clients. Also examining abstinence based prescribing.

2011-13 Innovative peer-based research training programme (no Powerpoint!) for substance misusers and kinship carers. Three published projects in collaboration with First Contact Clinical, service users, commissioners and other 3rd sector organisations. 
2004-2006 Forum-net
PCT/Central Surgery/Altana Pharma project to develop a network of GP, dental and pharmacy patient forums. 
2003-2008 – Substance Misuse
With Dr David Julien developed a model for managing substance misuse in general practice. 
2001- 2004 – Patient Forum development 
Developed a model for developing Patient Forums in general practice. South Tyneside Communication Award 2004. 
April 1998 – March 2003 – Doctorate of Medicine (MD)
University of Newcastle upon Tyne. Participant observation study of how patients and professionals negotiate appointments. Several publications. Lectured on qualitative methods MSc course 2001-2003 on computer analysis in qualitative research, 
Sept 1997-Aug 2001. Director of Northern and Yorkshire Research practice 
Portfolio of research into telephone working, physiotherapy, and managing access and demand.  
1995-2000. Telephone triage development
Developed daytime telephone triage of acute consultations with a team of 4 practice nurses. Won the NatWest/Doctor award (Oct 1997) for innovation in general practice.
1992-95 Member of South Tyneside MAAG
Responsible for developing consumerist audit/ research. Projects included a nominal group study of patient priorities for diabetes care, in collaboration with the CHC and Centre for Health Services Research in Newcastle, and a Delphi Study to inform diabetes policies. 
1991 Fellowship of the RCGP, for contribution to HIV/AIDS research in primary care.
1987- 89 RCGP Research Fellow
National study of the impact of HIV on General Practice in England, Wales and Scotland funded by the Department of Health. Largest survey of GPs and HIV in the world (5,300). 
Member of DoH/RCGP working party on HIV in primary care.

First Medical Director for Phoenix House in South Shields – this is a Tier 4 residential drug and alcohol detox and rehabilitation unit and is part of a national network of drug communities.
Witnessed the advent of HIV to this population group and developed the carities national policy for managing HIV jointly with someone who has since died of AIDS.
Left to become RCGP HIV/AIDS Research fellow.
Returned as medical director in 2011-12 – mainly providing detox to complex alcohol clients – introduced new standards.

Draft CV 

I  am taking things from this Bio that seem relevant then may work through drafts which will lead to a resume or bio.

I have been working as a GP in the northeast of England since 1981. Much of my work has included primary care research and substance misuse care. Former Royal College of GPs Research Fellow – GP attitudes to HIV. (1989). Research director

Health Education England 2016 photo challenge. Two images of mine ‘The GP’ and the distressed GP’ were included in the final on line publication 

Entries have been selected and compiled into an online book on the Health Education England website  www.hee.nhs.uk/gpphotobook

Health Education England (2016) Nothing general about General Practice: Two images by Dr Morris Gallagher, ‘The GP’ and ’The distressed GP (2015). At: http://www.hee.nhs.uk/gpphotobook (Accessed 07/07/2016).

2014 – date Open College of the Arts, Photography degree course. 


Commission (Oct 2017) – helping substance misuse service users in a recovery group to photograph what ‘Recovery’ is. First Contact Clinical, South Tyneside.

Name
Dr Morris Gallagher

morrisgabc@gmail.com | morris-gallagher.format.com | IG @morrisg

Education history 

University of Newcastle of Tyne, undergraduate (1979) and doctoral medical degree (2001). Final year (2022) of Open Collage of Arts, Photography degree 

Commissions, publications and exhibitions

Commission (Oct 2017) – helping substance misuse service users in a recovery group to photograph what ‘Recovery’ is. First Contact Clinical, South Tyneside. 

Health Education England (2016) Nothing general about General Practice: Two images by Dr Morris Gallagher, ‘The GP’ and ’The distressed GP (2015). At: http://www.hee.nhs.uk/gpphotobook (Accessed 07/07/2016).

Collections 

List the public institutions that own your artwork, such as museums, corporate collections, municipal collections or agencies. If you only
have artwork in private collections, don’t list the individual collector unless they give you permission and they’re well known in the industry. 

National Gallery of Art, Australia Private collection, Hong Kong 

Awards 

List the awards, grants, prizes and other honors that you have received for your work. 

2020 British Council Grant 

2018 Taylor Wessing Prize for Photographic Portraiture, Finalist 

2017 ING Unseen Talent Award, Winner 

Press 

List reviews, interviews, journals and media articles in which your work has been featured, including print and online. 

Sebag-Montefiore, Clarissa. “From Manus Island to sanctions on Iran: the art and opinions of Hoda Afshar”. The Guardian, 13 November 2018, https://www.theguardian.com/ artanddesign/2018/nov/13/from-manus-island-to-sanctions-on- iran-the-art-and-opinions-of-hoda-afshar. 

Publications 

List details of your monographs or publications that have featured your work. Cite your sources consistently, using a recognized citation guide. 

2019 Buchakjian, Gregory: “Personal Spaces, Public Places”, On Photography in Lebanon, KAPH 2018, p. 223-242 

I think that this CV can develop in this year as I am out there presenting my work and growing my CV. 

BIO

An artist biography is a summary of the significant events of your life that lead up to your art career. Unlike an artist statement, an artist bio can be written in the third person. It will include when and where you were born and where you are now based.

An artist bio can talk about how you first became interested in art and where you studied. It can discuss your education, degrees, formal art training, or apprenticeship programs you participated in. Essentially, an artist bio connects the impact your life history has on your artwork and talks about your concepts, philosophies, inspirations, and influences. (Artdex, 2021).

Your artist biography, on the other hand, can be used on your website or your profile on a gallery site. It may also be used in articles, interviews, or exhibition catalogs.

I have produced a CV for my linked in profile mainly as a way of recruiting participants to show my research experience. Maybe I should start with my CV.

Draft No 1

I was born in…

No – that does not work

Draft No 2 

Dr Morris Gallagher is a doctor who has always been interested in innovation and ideas. For most of his career that has been as an award-winning family doctor working in addictions and research in the northeast of England. More recently that passion has been expressed in creating photographs and artworks that say something about health and social care and his experiences of working within an institution. Most of his work is personal, diaristic and documentary but sometimes he incorporate conceptual approaches that are the best vehicle for sharing his messages.

I think that I will leave this as it is the initial proposal that will be most important then the part about what I about. 

References

Lens Culture (2021) Photographers’ Guide to Working with Galleries. At: https://www.lensculture.com/photography-free-guides. LensCulture_Gallery_Guide_2021-2.pdf (Accessed 04/01/2022).

Price, S. and Harbisher, B. (2022) Power, Media and the Covid-19 Pandemic: Framing Public Discourse (Edited book). Oxon: Routledge. At: https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=OzZPEAAAQBAJ&pg=PT123&lpg=PT123&dq=follow+the+science+quote+pandemic+reference&source=bl&ots=g6HT-lti7u&sig=ACfU3U3u7_F7jESAK3o2yHkORYXQ8xWfrg&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwim_Yy7pp31AhXDQUEAHQXWD6wQ6AF6BAgoEAM#v=onepage&q=follow%20the%20science%20quote%20pandemic%20reference&f=false (Accessed  06/01/2022).

Williams, G. (2014) How to write about contempory art. London: Thames and Hudson.

Artdex (2021) The Complete Guide to Writing an Artist Statement in 2021. At: https://www.artdex.com/the-complete-guide-to-writing-an-artist-statement-in-2021/ (Accessed  06/01/2021).

Relative Poverty. http://www.relativepoverty.org (2017) Directed by Monaghan, L. (s.n.). (Accessed 06/01/2022).

Health Education England (2016) Nothing general about General Practice: Two images by Dr Morris Gallagher, ‘The GP’ and ’The distressed GP (2015). At: http://www.hee.nhs.uk/gpphotobook (Accessed 07/07/2016).